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The Best Locations Around the World to go Swimming with Seals

Swimming or, snorkelling with seals (or sea lions) is one of the most exciting underwater adventures you could ever think of doing and, although there are countless animals in the world, many seals are absolutely fascinated by humans. If done properly, through a registered agent then you will be in safe hands and, be able to truly enjoy the experience for everything that it’s worth, here are a few of the best locations to see seals at their best;

New Zealand, Kaikoura

Snorkelling with seals on New Zealand’s South Island, rated one of the top ten wildlife experiences in the world by Lonely Planet, provides lots of interaction with the inquisitive New Zealand fur seal. From October to May, you’ll travel in small groups of two to six persons on an exclusive trip. Tours normally take 2.5 hours, and businesses will often give sufficient safety protection.

NSW, Australia

New South Wales in Australia is home to some of the best seal swimming operators who can take you to Narooma, seal swimming, out in the open seas. Some of the operators offer different excursions whereby you can visit different parts of the coastline and various landmarks or to one of the local islands to see the seals bathing on the rocks, ‘showing off’ and coming to greet you if you are brave enough to jump into the waters and say hello

United Kingdom, Farne Islands

The Farne Islands in northeast England’s chilly waters (46 F or 8 C) are home to hundreds of gray seals and their pups throughout the winter months. Before diving in, put on a dry suit and explore the shallow gorges and gullies that are home to gigantic sea stars, kelp beds, fish, and diving puffins. If you can withstand the cold then you will be able to see some of the country’s most wonderful wildlife and maybe even get ‘nibbled’ on by a seal.

Canada’s Hornby Island

Divers wrap up every winter off Hornby Island, British Columbia, to dive with Steller sea lions. These noisy creatures, which may gather in groups of up to 100, speed back and forth, using their 10-foot (3-meter) bodies to propel them through the waters, a truly amazing sight. Despite the fact that these big creatures may achieve speeds of up to 30 mph, sea lions are not hazardous. Many dive companies in the region offer safe and informative trips, and divers frequently spot other sea animals. Keep a watch out for wolf eels, octopus, and massive marine invertebrates.

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